Alzheimer’s Myths Exposed

Elderly woman with headaches

 

Alzheimer’s is a terrible disease increasingly affecting the elderly community in the United States and around the world. While much research is being done and newer treatments are being invested in, there is still uncertainty about Alzheimer’s disease among doctors regarding the cause and cure for Alzheimer’s. This uncertainty has lead to speculations that have turned into popular Alzheimer’s myths that are not proven facts. With many articles floating around the Internet and well-meaning misinformed messengers, it can be hard to know what to believe regarding Alzheimer’s disease information.

 

Here is a list of 4 Alzheimer’s myths you need to know that must be exposed:

 

Myth 1. Alzheimer’s just affects elderly people.
Although most cases of Alzheimer’s disease occur in seniors over the age of 65 years old, there are still substantial instances of people as young as their 30s or 40s developing the disease. Just under 10% of Alzheimer’s cases are from these younger demographics.

 

Myth 2. Still having a good memory means you don’t have Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s first affects short term memory and the ability to learn and retain new information. Just because a senior loved one can still vividly recall their oldest, dearest memories, does not mean that Alzheimer’s has not taken root. Look for quirkiness in recalling recent events, rather than forgetting details for long ago when watching for Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Myth 3. Alzheimer’s victims are unaware of their symptoms.

The signs of Alzheimer’s do not go unnoticed by most seniors. A failing memory is hard to ignore, and it can be very concerning. The disruptions of memory trouble may lead seniors to become afraid that memory lapses will lead to bad accidents like leaving the stove on, and seniors may feel that they cannot trust themselves. Some days will be better than others for recollection, so a senior must develop an effective plan with caregivers and establish good communication.

 

Myth 4. Smarter, More Educated Seniors Lose Memory Faster.

Higher education and mental stimulation actually help the health of the brain and assist in preserving memory for longer. Staying active and working cognitive activities into the day, using basic problem solving skills can go a long way in preserving a healthy brain for longer.  Wealthier, more educated seniors may have the opportunity and capability to recognize signs of Alzheimer’s disease “sooner,” but Alzheimer’s is no respecter of persons.

 

Unfortunately, memory is in fact an inevitable part of the aging process. Every five years after the age of 65, a senior’s chances of developing Alzheimer’s doubles. Although the likelihood of memory loss does increase with age, that is no guarantee that memory loss will occur. Many senior live with healthy minds decades into their retirement years. A great precaution for avoiding Alzheimer’s disease is to adhere to simple health strategies such as proper diet and exercise, and to educate yourself with the various Alzheimer’s facts as they become discovered through new research, as well as to caution yourself against the Alzheimer’s myths by doing a little research of your own.

 

 

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