Non Medical Home Care

 

Young attractive woman working in care home

One of the common duties of an in-home care provider for seniors is provision of medication. However, distributing medicine to elders is not the only task offered by home care providers. There are many important uses and needs for in-home care, even when an elder at home requires no medical assistance. Non Medical home care focuses on assisting elders at home with activities of daily living (ADLs) that are needed to be able to keep living comfortably from home.

 

The rent, amenities, and monitoring costs of assisted living can be too expensive of an investment for many seniors who require help with certain daily tasks. Home care services available to seniors span across both professional (senior care agencies) as well as informal (friends and family) networks of support. The goal of non-medical home care is to assist elders in maintaining as much personal independence as possible in their senior years.

 

With in-home care, seniors still have the freedom to rule their own roost in their familiar and comfortable living space. Sometimes nursing homes, adult day care, or assisted living facilities set rules, regulations, and requirements that may not be agreeable to certain lifestyles. Receiving non medical home care helps seniors to avoid ant-pet policies, curfews, standardized dining hours, etc. that may clash with a senior’s preferred living habits by allowing seniors more choice and more say in how to coordinate their daily living activities.

 

Non medical home care is often chosen as an option for families who want to stay close to their elder loved ones, whose schedules don’t allow for their adult children to serve as full-time caregivers. There is a variety of non medical home care options available to seniors; we will go over the specifics here:
Home Based Services – these in-home supportive services have a mission to help seniors with physical and mental limitations in undergoing daily living activities in their homes. Some services may be covered by government care, non-profits, or other specializing businesses, depending on the amount of care needed.

 

Home Care Registry –  these registries keep track of the many home care offerings and their number of years of experience to help clients understand the qualifications and expectations of the services they seek. Professional caregiver services for non medical in home care may include Home Health Aides (HHA) or Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA).

 

Home Health Care Agency – A home health care agency offers a variety of home care, specializing in providing skilled care, physical therapy, and occupational therapy for senior patients at home.

 

Independent Providers – privately hiring a non medical home care provider can place much of the screening, background checking, and hiring in your hands. This can be riskier than using a registry that keeps track of a non medical home care provider’s records, unless you have received a recommendation from a reliable source, or know the non medical home care provider personally.

 

None of these non medical home care options are inherently better than the others; each has their pluses and minuses, and in the end it is up to the family of a senior loved one to determine whether a caregiver is qualified to assisted an elder with the activities of daily living, such as bathing, dining, dressing, etc.

 

 

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Helpful Senior Marriage Advice

 

It is often surprising to young people today when they ask a senior married couple how long they have been together and get an answer like 50 years! In our modern society, nearly 50% of marriages end in divorce, it is not uncommon to be remarried several times. Young men and women who want to create a successful marriage for themselves can look to lasting senior marriages to find the key to staying together.

 

Focus group questioning of seniors who had been married for 30, 40, 50 years and above has provided us with their answers for what it takes to maintain a healthy and enduring marriage. This list of senior marriage tips outlines some of the principles and habits that are most been useful and effective for seniors to maintain strong marriages, and can also be applied for seniors looking to find new senior relationships later in life after a loved on has passed.

 

Our senior marriage advice list focuses much on attitude and interaction tips for building an encouraging routine and also warns of potential pitfalls that consume many marriages. There is no such thing as a perfect, effortless marriage. It is a commitment that will always take work and adherence to these principles, regardless of the amount of years you have been together.

 

  • Choose Your Battles Wisely
Not every minor dispute needs to escalate to a big argument. Statistics actually show that fighting is an aspect of a healthy marriage, instead of merely bottling up emotions, opinions, and wants then not communicating. Although, too much bickering can create an atmosphere of resentment in the home. Not every argument has to be heated; there can be room for compromise on issues that aren’t crucially important to you.

 

  • Don’t Be Spiteful or Vengeful
    There will surely come times when your spouse crosses a line, forgets something important, does something selfish, etc. It can be tempting to hold a grudge, seek revenge, or give a cold shoulder to punish them. Spite cripples a relationship dynamic. Communicating your grievances sincerely and accepting apologies when they are earnestly given can be most effective at mending wounds. Make an effort to resolve issues both respectfully and promptly to avoid long-lingering bitterness at home.

 

  • Jealousy and Insecurity are Damaging
    Trust is as critical a factor of importance as love. Many people drive themselves crazy by obsessing over all the friendships and work associates in a spouse’s life, but it is important to stay trusting until you are given a good reasons not to. A little bit of jealousy is healthy—it shows you care. However, obsessive jealously can make life a drudge for both spouses.

 

  • Understand Your Spouse’s Love Language
    Everyone expresses love a little differently. Affection assumes many forms, and there are certain romantic gestures that garner a better response than others. The five primary love languages are listed as, “words of affirmation,” “acts of service,” “receiving gifts,” “spending quality time,” and “physical touch.” To an extent, relationships requires giving and receiving all of these things, but you must find out which love language your spouse responds to the best.

 

  • Prioritize Your Commitment to the Marriage, Not Just Your Kids
A phrase you hear too often is, “we stayed together for the kids,” and while that may seem noble on the surface, it is not a good mantra for a healthy marriage.   Putting your children as the centerpiece of your lives will detract considerable from your prioritizing each other and diminish your quality time together. In addition to meeting your kids’ needs, be sure to arrange for occasions where you can have a life with each other—That’s what baby-sitters are for!

 

  • Kisses May Mend Relationships, As Well As Boo-Boos
Kissing one another saying hello and goodbye serves to build intimacy in the marriage dynamic. The morning routine rush or leftover bad moods from recent argumentative can reduce the motivation to kiss, embrace, or be intimate until it is suddenly out of the routine all together. However, allowing this important personal connection to slip away from the routine will hurt a marriage.

 

  • View Divorce as a Last Resort and Don’t Use it as a Threat
Divorce may sometimes be the only solution to very serious circumstances; but too many couples these days view the first seasons of unhappiness or marital conflict as an excuse to press the divorce-button. When inevitable issues come up, it may be appropriate to take a moment and reflect on why you made your marriage vows in the first place, saying, “Til death do us part.” Divorce doesn’t only wreck a marriage, but also a family, finances, property, lifestyle, etc. It should be considered as a last resort when all else has failed. If two people enter into a marriage agreeing that divorce is no casual option, then those people might have greater commitment to each other and working out problems.

 

 

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Senior Metastatic Melanoma Statistics

Smiling senior man at the beach

 

As aging adults enter their senior years, taking every precaution to protect a body growing gradually more frail becomes an essential course of action for prolonging a senior’s life and health. Skin often becomes even more delicate during senior years, and applying sunblock is a crucial safeguard toward the various types of skin cancer that put seniors at risk.

 

The most aggressive kind of skin cancer is melanoma, and it is also the sixth most common kind of cancer overall. The majority of those diagnosed with melanoma cancer are seniors over the age of sixty, putting adults in their golden years at higher risk for the disease. When melanoma has spread to other areas of the body, it is called metastatic (advanced) melanoma.

 

Once Melanoma has spread from the original tumor site to other serious places in the body (lymph nodes, lungs, liver, brain, etc.), it is identified as being Stage IV Melanoma.

 

How Many Are Affected by Metastatic Melanoma?

 

The American Caner Society has estimated that there are over 75,000 cases of melanoma in the U.S. alone, resulting in under 10,000 deaths per year. Approximately 12% of metastatic melanoma cases end fatally each year.

 

 

Senior Metastatic Melanoma Risks

 

Lack of precaution for ultra violet rays is the leading danger for metastatic melanoma. When sunblock or appropriate clothing covering for hot weather days are neglected, it increases risk of skin cancer.

The risk of melanoma is greatest for seniors who have weaker immune systems, fair skin complexions, spend much time in the sun, or have a family history of melanoma.

 

Senior Metastatic Melanoma Prognosis

 

For Metastatic Melanoma in seniors, the typical 5-year survival rate is about 15-20%, and the ten year survival rate is 10-15%.

 

The severity of stage IV melanoma will vary based on where exactly the cancer has spread to in a senior’s body. The worst place melanoma can spread is the inner organs, but metastatic melanoma is somewhat less severe when it spreads instead to other parts of the skin or distant lymph nodes.

 

Other factors affect the survival rate as well. Older age often leads to higher mortality likelihood with metastatic melanoma, with age 70 and above being the most impacted age range. Also, Caucasian men are prone to be at the highest risk of developing melanoma.

 

Is Metastatic Melanoma Treatable for Seniors?

 

Catching the disease early on provides the best chance of effective treatment. Irregular moles and very bad sunburns may be indicators of melanoma in seniors. Once melanoma has reached stage IV, surgery efforts to remove melanoma are rarely successful. There are drug treatment and biologic therapies available to treat and slow the progression of the disease and better the quality of life for affected seniors with metastatic melanoma.

 

 

 

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Most Common Causes of Senior Vision Loss

Male optician examining senior patients eyes through slit lamp in clinic

 

It is a common affliction brought on by aging for the five senses to gradually diminish in seniors. Eyesight is one of the most prevalent bodily functions to deteriorate in elder years, and it can be a very distressing and alarming issue. Just under 7 million senior Americans over the age of 65 have developed severe vision impairment.

 

Understanding the different vision disorders brought on by age may help seniors recognize problems and seek available treatments more quickly before serious vision damage is done.

 

The three primary vision disorders in seniors are

  • Age related macular degeneration (AMD)
  • Glaucoma
  • Cataracts

These terrible eye conditions often go undiagnosed and unnoticed for long periods of time because they progress very gradually. These conditions frequently go undetected until serious damage has been done and it become more difficult to treat effectively. Older adults may be wise to schedule moderately routine eye exams, understanding that they as seniors are more susceptible to these disorders.

 

Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) – this eye condition slowly damages the retina, leaving peripheral vision mostly intact, but alarmingly making anything you try to directly focus on blur and disappear. The safety risks of AMD are obvious, as reading, facial recognition, and navigating spaces are severely hampered with this type of vision loss.

 

AMD is not currently curable, however, medications are available to slow down its progression considerably. Fortunately, AMD is not physically painful to the body or eyes, nor does it damage or effect any other bodily functions. Seniors developing AMD often seek care in assisted living facilities for help with certain daily tasks.

 

Glaucoma – Symptoms of glaucoma include increased pressure in the eye cavity, causing nerve damage, vision impairment, and even pain in the eye. Glaucoma educes tunnel vision in seniors .

 

Treatments for glaucoma are surgical as well as pharmaceutical, able to slow the progression of the degeneration and reduce pain, however there is no cure for the disorder. Glaucoma is exceedingly prominent in seniors over the age of 70, so vision checks are recommended for seniors in their later years to detect and hinder the progression of this disorder which can also dramatically effect a senior’s ability to live independently and safely.

 

Cataracts – This disorder clouds the lens of the eye by clumping naturally occurring proteins in the eye. Cataracts are the most common cause of vision impairment and blindness in the world. Men and women of all ages can develop cataracts, however cataracts are most prevalent for senior vision loss.

 

Cataracts are relatively easily detected through basic eye inspections. This eye disorder is characterized by blurred vision and fading of color comprehension. Although cataracts do not cause pain, they are capable of deteriorating vision to the point of total blindness, hindering independent living for senior citizens. Cataracts may be treated with drops and these eye clumps may be removed with surgery.

 

 

The causes of these eye disorders are not fully known, however, they are generally able to be detected and slowed in their progression. It is important for seniors to be aware of their higher proneness for developing vision impairment and to schedule semi-regular eye inspections in their later years to ensure prolonged independent living and quality of life.

 

 

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Alzheimer’s Myths Exposed

Elderly woman with headaches

 

Alzheimer’s is a terrible disease increasingly affecting the elderly community in the United States and around the world. While much research is being done and newer treatments are being invested in, there is still uncertainty about Alzheimer’s disease among doctors regarding the cause and cure for Alzheimer’s. This uncertainty has lead to speculations that have turned into popular Alzheimer’s myths that are not proven facts. With many articles floating around the Internet and well-meaning misinformed messengers, it can be hard to know what to believe regarding Alzheimer’s disease information.

 

Here is a list of 4 Alzheimer’s myths you need to know that must be exposed:

 

Myth 1. Alzheimer’s just affects elderly people.
Although most cases of Alzheimer’s disease occur in seniors over the age of 65 years old, there are still substantial instances of people as young as their 30s or 40s developing the disease. Just under 10% of Alzheimer’s cases are from these younger demographics.

 

Myth 2. Still having a good memory means you don’t have Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s first affects short term memory and the ability to learn and retain new information. Just because a senior loved one can still vividly recall their oldest, dearest memories, does not mean that Alzheimer’s has not taken root. Look for quirkiness in recalling recent events, rather than forgetting details for long ago when watching for Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Myth 3. Alzheimer’s victims are unaware of their symptoms.

The signs of Alzheimer’s do not go unnoticed by most seniors. A failing memory is hard to ignore, and it can be very concerning. The disruptions of memory trouble may lead seniors to become afraid that memory lapses will lead to bad accidents like leaving the stove on, and seniors may feel that they cannot trust themselves. Some days will be better than others for recollection, so a senior must develop an effective plan with caregivers and establish good communication.

 

Myth 4. Smarter, More Educated Seniors Lose Memory Faster.

Higher education and mental stimulation actually help the health of the brain and assist in preserving memory for longer. Staying active and working cognitive activities into the day, using basic problem solving skills can go a long way in preserving a healthy brain for longer.  Wealthier, more educated seniors may have the opportunity and capability to recognize signs of Alzheimer’s disease “sooner,” but Alzheimer’s is no respecter of persons.

 

Unfortunately, memory is in fact an inevitable part of the aging process. Every five years after the age of 65, a senior’s chances of developing Alzheimer’s doubles. Although the likelihood of memory loss does increase with age, that is no guarantee that memory loss will occur. Many senior live with healthy minds decades into their retirement years. A great precaution for avoiding Alzheimer’s disease is to adhere to simple health strategies such as proper diet and exercise, and to educate yourself with the various Alzheimer’s facts as they become discovered through new research, as well as to caution yourself against the Alzheimer’s myths by doing a little research of your own.

 

 

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When To Take Caregiving Breaks

Generational differences

 

When you, as the adult child of a senior with need, assume the responsibilities of caretaker for your elder loved one, it may become difficult to balance your responsibilities for assisting your parent with their life and finding time to live your own. Life’s special occasions and landmark events may occasionally create need for you to break away and take some time off from your duties as caregiver.

An anniversary dinner with your spouse, a daughter’s dance recital, or an important business trip may call for attention and priority. With proper planning and anticipation, your world doesn’t have to fall apart with anxiety and guilt whenever you can’t personally be around to look after your senior loved one’s needs and have to take caregiving breaks. Below we provide some helpful strategies for how to take a break from your caregiving duties while still keeping your peace of mind.

 

 

  1. Call friends and family to care-give while you are away. Typically these are the people closest to you that you can trust to monitor and care for your elder loved one properly. Another plus, is that your elder parent probably already has a comfortable, relaxed relationship with these people, and there is no risk of awkward unfamiliarity or new introductions. Usually your close friends and family will gladly help you out with monitoring a senior loved one, so it is free or relatively cheap to enlist their care.
  2. In-home care and other personal care assistants can take care of business at home when you cannot. In home care professionals and skilled nurses can be elder companions qualified to look after a senior’s needs and keep the house habitable. Trusting a stranger to watch over your loved one may be a little unnerving at first, so make sure to find someone with a good referral, whether from a friend or reliable reviews and testimonies on in-home care agency websites online.
  3. Adult day care facilities may be a good alternative to in-home care in circumstances where you have to be away for long periods of time during the day. Adult day care provides an escape from the boredom and tedium of sitting around the house all day by giving seniors who need monitoring and medical attention a social and recreational outlet under the watch of trained professionals.
  4. Assisted living may be a viable option for seniors who may still be able to live relatively independently but just need a little help with some daily tasks, such as dining, dressing, bathing, etc. Placing your senior loved one in a reputable assisted living facility nearby may allow you the security of knowing your senior loved one is safe and in good hands, with you on call to meet any additional needs if necessary.

 

Caregiving for senior parents is done by adult children of various lifestyles. Some caregivers have the time to stay at home and offer more direct, continuous care than others who may have a career to balance with their caregiving duties. Regardless of your living circumstance, there are options available to make sure your senior loved one continues to receive the care he or she requires in the moments when you must be called away. It is not neglectful to place an elder in the care of a trusted professional for times when you have other obligations to attend to or need caregiving breaks.

 

 

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Senior Driving – How To Keep Your License

handsome senior man driving a car

Senior citizens in America often have a stereotypical stigma for poor driving capabilities. However, getting older does not automatically impair your driving skills. The changes brought on by age in senior’s bodies may affect physical and cognitive traits used for driving, but there are ways that seniors can consciously improve their driving skills to keep their license for longer in spite of these changes by being careful.

 

How exactly does age affect senior driving abilities?

 

  • Alzheimer and dementia – As senior Americans enter into their later years, they often become more susceptible to cognitive diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia, diseases that affect memory, thinking, and problem solving skills.
  • Eyesight and hearing impairment – Hindrances to vision and hearing brought on by aging can affect senior driving for reading signs and environmental cues. Senior eyesight may become too sensitive to the sun through the windshield or headlights at night as well. Seniors can check their eyesight and hearing at a doctors office to be deemed safe for the road.
  • Arthritis disease – diseases affecting the hands and dexterity can be harmful to senior driving abilities when handling the wheel.
  • Bad joints – Additionally, the joints used in turning the wheel, putting on a seatbelt, and operating a car’s brakes and accelerator can become an issue for senior driving.
  • Reflexes – Certain cognitive impairments can affect the reflexes necessary for making fast reactions to traffic occurrences or responding to traffic signals and signs, or abrupt stops. Aging may result in a shorter attention span and reduced multi-tasking skills needed for navigating a dynamic road.
  • Physical disabilities and pain – Sometimes injuries and health development result in states of pain and discomfort that can become distracting and hazardous to a senior’s ability to focus on the road.
  • Over-cautiousness – Seniors are often aware of their fragility and cognitive problems, but do not want to risk losing their license by making mistake. This results in some seniors being overly cautious and driving dangerously slow (to avoid speeding or accidents) but may put others at risk who are trying to maneuver around them.

 

Seniors viewing loosing their drivers license as equivalent to loosing their freedom in the 21st century world. To make sure that you are still capable of road traveling, a senior may submit themselves for a driver refresher course. Costs for driver refresher courses are often covered by the AARP for senior members.

 

 

Smart Driving Tips to Help You Keep Your License

 

  • Only drive in familiar areas, plan your route ahead of time for new destinations to reduce anxiety and possible confusion
  • Try to make trips to places that are close and easy to reach.
  • Allow for extra time when making a trip or outing, so you are not rushed or prone to make any irrational driving decisions
  • Do not drive when you feel stress or exhaustion. Arrange for a carpool or get a ride when you feel these symptoms.
  • Be aware of the side effects of medicines, and whether or not it is advisable to operate machinery or drive after a dose.
  • Always wear a seatbelt when driving; it is not only critical for safety, but the law of the land.
  • For seniors who use cell phones or smartphones, always be sure not to add the extra hazardous distraction of talking on the phone or texting while driving.
  • Regularly check your mirrors while driving to maintain a sense of your surroundings.
  • For the safety and comfort of others, try not to drive to close behind anyone driving in front of your vehicle.

 

When is it time to give up driving?

 

Pay attention for the exterior signs and indications of when it may be at last time to consider giving up driving for the sake of your health and safety. If you are experiencing:

  • Large amounts of other drivers honking at you frequently
  • Have you been having many close-calls or accidents lately
  • Are you getting lost often while on the road
  • Have members of your family expressed concern

 

Other Transportations Options

 

Retiring your license is not the end of the world. A senior can find many alternative methods for getting around when driving is not longer an option. You may get a ride from members of your family when living at home. Public transportation like buses and cabs are available in city areas. Many senior living facilities offer transportation for senior residents as well.

 

 

doggie car

Does a Good Night Sleep Prevent Alzheimer’s?

Senior Couple Sleeping In Bed

 

New studies are suggesting that quality sleep can be a big factor in helping to “detoxify” a healthy brain, and keep the development Alzheimer’s in seniors at bay. The obligations of daily living for adults can make it difficult to get the proper amount of rest advised by sleep doctors—a full 8 hours. However, getting a full night’s rest may offer more than just beauty sleep, but also healthy brain sleep to prevent Alzheimer’s in seniors later in life.

 

Research conducted at the University of Berkeley has shown that disturbed sleep and insufficient amounts of sleep may be contributors to the development of Alzheimer’s disease in seniors. By using brain scans on seniors with and without Alzheimer’s, University scientists determined that a lack of sleep caused a build up of what they call “garbage proteins” in the brain that directly affect the quality of mental cognition.

 

Understanding that Alzheimer’s disease was a well-known cause of disturbed sleep, these Berkeley researches set out to determine if the opposite proved true as well—can bad sleep cause Alzheimer’s? Scientists noticed a mysterious toxic protein forming in the brains of seniors with habits for poor sleep. Normally, our body uses sleep to metabolize this pesky protein until it evaporates, ceasing to be a threat. However, when sleep is not allowed to do its job, this toxic protein phenomenon may accumulate over time and do damage to a healthy mind. In other words, when ignoring our need for sleep by trying to be productive, we are inadvertently leaving a mess inside our own minds.

 

When the brains in animals were evaluated before human testing began, similar connections were discovered with sleep deprivation and mental cognition. This garbage protein was found to accumulate in the brains of mice as well, causing their brains to shrink and decay, like Alzheimer’s does to a human mind.

 

These findings are not completely conclusive, and further study is required, however, in understanding the mechanisms and proteins involved in this terrible memory loss disease, we may be one step closer to curing it soon. While it is tempting to ignore your human need for rest in order to fit in more work or recreation into your day, keep in mind that sleep is just as vital to your health as a good diet or exercise. Do your best to hit the pillow early, because a good night sleep may prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

 

 

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Adult Care

young woman helping senior lady with the housework

 

While Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are still in their earliest stages in seniors, you may find your senior loved one can still function and perform daily tasks independently. Seniors at the beginning of their struggle with Alzheimer’s may still effectively socialize, carry out their jobs, and drive. This is the stage where your duties of adult care for your affected senior are the least demanding. But it is no less tragic to know that worse phases of the illness are yet to come, and to watch your aging parent’s behavior and trademark personality slowly change as their mental health deteriorates.

 

Alzheimer’s is a very frustrating disease because it is currently unpreventable and incapable of being slowed or stopped in affected seniors. The best thing you as their caregiver can do is to educate yourself as much as possible about their dementia, so that you can know what to expect and how to handle eventual troubling symptoms as they arise in later stages of the disease.

 

“Early stage” Alzheimer’s is characterized by mild obstruction to a senior’s thinking and learning abilities but can still actively participate in conversation and activities, with a few hiccups perhaps. Alzheimer can often go undetected for a while during the early stages, as elders may conscious enough simply dismiss weak symptoms as “brain farts” or having “a senior moment.” The beginning phase of Alzheimer’s disease may last a few years before worsening to more noticeable and tragic effects.

 

Life After An Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

 

Once you get confirmation from a doctor that a senior loved one has Alzheimer’s disease, your approach to caring for them may be more of a partnership than extensive caregiving duties. You may be helping them remember where they were in the story they were telling, or reminding them to take their medication, without having to heavily involve yourself in every aspect of their daily routine.

 

Being able to go slow at the early stages of disease gives you a grace period where you can work with your aging parent, spouse, or extended family on planning for the long-term care strategy for a senior in later stages of the disease when the effects of the disease worsen. Not every family is in a position to provide the extensive amount of caregiving, monitoring, and medical attention that an advanced Alzheimer’s senior needs. Careers and education can be obstacles keeping an adult child from providing 24/7 round-the-clock care for a senior. Working with your aging parent in the early stages gives you ample preparation time to plan and get family finances in order for arranging the best-fitting senior care coverage.

 

Ways You Can Be Helpful In Early Alzheimer’s Stages

 

As we mentioned before, a senior at the beginning of their struggle with Alzheimer’s may only need some light assistance with daily tasks and obligations. Ways you can be a help to a senior with dementia may include:

  • Keeping track of medicines and reminding when to take them
  • Helping to manage their money or pay bills
  • Assisting with organizing events or outings
  • Finding misplaced items around the house
  • Keeping track of important phone numbers for them

 

Your Caregiving Attitude For Early Stage Alzheimer’s

 

Keeping a positive and encouraging attitude for a senior during early stage Alzheimer’s  is key to their peace of mind and reducing their stress during this rough time. You will have to muster up a greater degree of patience and slow pacing for activities than you are used to when handling a senior loved one’s affairs. As a caregiver, it is important that you remain supportive and do not make them feel like a burden. Then again, if you do not feel you are capable of providing the extent of care they need, and do view your new duties as a burden, it may be best to consider placing your senior in the professional hands of a memory care facility.

 

Not everyone is cut out for caregiving, and if you feel you are not capable of doing it with a loving and sincere attitude, it may be better to leave it to skilled nurses who have made a career out of it. Letting guilt make your decision to be a caregiver against your will can lead to an atmosphere of resentment in a home, which is not healthy for anyone in this rough time.

 

Frustration and stress can be avoided by preparing as soon as possible, and not putting off planning for senior care until it suddenly becomes imperative. Evaluating your options for the best care is not a good decision to rush. It takes time and research to get it right. Ask your doctor any questions you have about how Alzheimer’s disease may affect specific aspects of your family’s unique lifestyle, and make the needed adjustments for a smooth caregiving environment with all the family working together as a team.

 

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What is Alzheimers

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What is Alzheimers, What Are Alzheimer’s Hallucinations? 

 

When a senior has Alzheimer’s hallucinations, that senior may see, hear, feel, smell, taste things that aren’t really there. Sometimes hallucinations terrorize a senior with cognitive disorders, other times hallucinations just confuse or mislead them. Often times, dementia-induced hallucinations take the form of visions of people, images, or objects from a senior’s past.

 

Hallucinations are caused by Alzheimer’s disease as it slowly deteriorates and alters a healthy brain. False perceptions brought on by hallucinations usually don’t develop until the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease in seniors. When you suspect that a senior loved on in your care is having hallucinations, it is important to arrange a doctor’s visit for evaluation to be sure that hallucinations have not been brought on by other possible causes. Other ailments that could potentially bring on hallucinations in seniors include Schizophrenia, dehydration, alcohol abuse, and complications with medicine dosages.

 

How to Treat Hallucinations

 

Scheduling a medical evaluation can determine what stage of the disease a senior is in, and what may be the best medical treatment for an Alzheimer’s senior at that point. Usually, the initial treatment involves a non-drug approach, such as vitamins or diet change. But when these methods fail to alleviate cognition impairment, medications may be prescribed, Doctors can prescribe antipsychotic medications to seniors with developed cases of Alzheimer’s.

 

 

Handling Hallucination Episodes

 

There are strategies for coping with hallucinations for seniors who don’t whose hallucinations do not seem to hinder their ability to carry out daily life. If the hallucinations are upsetting and inhibiting to their comfort, security, happiness, or ability to socialize and interact with others, you may need to come up with a set of calming words or reassuring touches to re-stabilize an Alzheimer’s senior’s peace of mind.

 

Respond to hallucination episodes in a supportive manner and comforting words. When a frightened episode occurs in response to a hallucination, offering up quick distractions may be an effective manner to call attention away from their false sensory perceptions.

 

Modifying a hallucinating senior’s environment may be helpful in restoring peace to their living space. Objects that are prone to set them off might be best hidden or moved. Home items that make loud noises or startling sounds should be relocated to areas where a senior with Alzheimer’s can be better monitored.

 

 

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